Why it’s bigger on the inside.

19 08 2012

This post is about the famous TARDIS and why it’s bigger on the inside.

Now, before I begin, I know this will cause argument, I know also that fans will point to that thing The Doctor said in that particular episode… Though I think by now most of you know “The Doctor Lies”.

In any case, this is just a nice little experiment in expanding the mind, it’s not a fictional story, but what I thought may actually make it work, the size thing, I have been pondering this for quite some time.

Not that it matters, but perhaps I should add that the series began in 1963, while I began in 1965, and ABC has been broadcasting the series since the beginning… The word TARDIS has been coming out of the speaker of our television sets for many years now.

Let’s begin.

I would like you to imagine two spaces, this space… and that space.
This space is exactly that, THIS space, it is everything you can see, including the air, the sky and us.

That space, is the other space and that space is somehow integrated with this space.

Now I’d like you to imagine that This space, you, the table, the floor, the sky, your dog and I are all drawn on an un-inflated balloon… we’re all quite small, unless someone inflates the balloon, and then we all stretch out.

The TARDIS is like the air in that Balloon, and when it lands, everything bulges out like pictures on the skin of a balloon… except… we don’t notice it, because everything else has bulged out too… we don’t feel it, it doesn’t matter to any of us.

But there’s an interface, a facade between the ship, the inner part of the TARDIS, which is the Police Box, which exists in this space… open the doors and cross the threshold and suddenly you realise that it’s not a Police Box thing which has appeared, much more like a Super Tanker, yet it’s done no damage at all to this space, and your body snaps back to it’s apparent original shape.

Of course objects are going through this space all the time, distorting and stretching things like carnival mirrors or a mouse under a rug, we simply don’t notice.

And we could, once in the TARDIS look out and see everything stretching like mad, but what would be the use of that, so the ship provides compensation so that everything appears to be “Normal”.
Does that sound reasonable?

Wolfie!