Introverts at Weddings

18 08 2016

Often, a person has vegan friends, who are easy to cater for at a wedding reception,  it’s practical to assume a vegan or vegetarian will be attending anyway, so people have a choice.

But I find that introverts are generally over looked.

We’d tell you, but we’d rather not be any bother.

Going to the Wedding itself is generally not that much of a concern, Churches at at least fairly quiet and comfortable… even if you are an atheist.

An outdoor wedding, if the weather allows, is even better.

It’s the reception afterwards which is tricky.

A wedding reception is a giant affair which extroverts lap up, but we introverts find very confronting.

So I thought I’d offer a few ideas for consideration.

We do want to be there, you’re very likely a good friend who we cherish, and you probably already know that I’m (We’re) as quiet as a church mouse. The celebration is going to be a stretch for us, but we want to meet you half-way.

It might be wise to seat us with someone we know very well and get on with. I once had a friend who thought that I should be seated well away from my Parents and sit with some of his friends, who were lovely, but I didn’t know them at all, and it bothered me.

After I ate, I really wanted nothing more than to escape. I love music, but I love it when it’s coming out of speakers and I have the controls in my hand.

I don’t know if it’s an introvert thing, but I dislike loud music, I like clarity and quiet.

Escape at a reception often consists of two options, hiding in the lav or going outside. the lav is usually bustling with people needing to pee or freshen up, so it’s not ideal, plus it’s holding things up.

Going outside might be ok, but it might be cold, dark and a bit spooky.

What’s needed is an escape room, if you’re an extrovert then you probably have a “chill out” room in your mind… people lounging around, soft blue lights, chill out music… no.

What I have in mind is a room with soft furnishings, possibly with a few bean bags on the floor to sprawl over or crawl into.

A table with a few goodies on it, cakes, bikkies, wine and a nice warm pot of tea.

Some books perhaps, and wi-fi.

If it’s not too cold, an open window would be lovely.

I personally wouldn’t mind if others joined me, and that we could have a conversation and share some tea, that is my idea of mingling.

Plus if someone has had enough, I don’t mind nursing them for a while either… not because they’re drunk, that’s entirely different.

It doesn’t have to be fancy either.

What are your thoughts?

 

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Pirate of the Airwaves

16 08 2016

My favourite theory about Piracy is that if many people could pay for what they downloaded for free, they wouldn’t bother buying it at all.

Which means that neither the artist or record company would be affected.

I might be wrong, but if you’re not totally sold on an album which will set you back $20, then why buy it at all?

Some of you know that I buy fancy limited edition vinyl records, I do so because they’re a kind of souvenir which is special and I can only get for a week or two before they’re all gone.

I don’t play these records, in fact I don’t even own a working turntable.

If I want to listen to music then I’m perfectly happy listening to something on YouTube or some streaming service, even the radio.

And that’s what I wanted to talk about.

I listen to a classic rock station at home, and I find that certain names pop up frequently, The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Queen and David Bowie to name just a few.

Now I don’t know if anyone has considered this before but, If I am really keen on a particular artist, and their songs are played about twice a day on the radio, then what reason do I have to go out and spend $20 on a CD?

Sure the radio station pays royalties, and quite a lot actually.

I tried to run my own radio station from home at one point, but the licence fee was a killer, and that was partly why I shut it down, the other reason was that I never thought it would take off anyway and knew I’d get tired of it, which of course I did.

But do the royalties give the artist (or should I say their record company) as much as if the public went “Gosh I love that band, I really must buy one of their CDs”?

It’s a very fine line, you promote yourself online, or on the radio which helps people remember you and your music, and perhaps even buy it.

Or they hear you too often and don’t buy your work at all.